Author Question: Law Enforcement Shooting with Vest in Place

Carol Asks:

I have a cop who is involved in a shooting. She’s wearing a vest and is hit outside the vest’s protective area. I need her hospitalized long enough that the shooter (who she killed— they shot simultaneously, more or less) to have been claimed post autopsy. I can’t have her debilitated for months— just a week or two. Where would I shoot her? Hip? Leg seems hard to hit and shoulder does too. I don’t want her disabled, nor do I want a months long rehab.

Jordyn Says:

What I would recommend is a shot coming through the side, under the armpit, causing the lung to collapse. I would pick the right side over the left— there’s just a lot more vasculature on the left that could prove deadly/problematic. If her right arm was raised and she was say . . . turning into the shot . . .  it could leave her vulnerable.

She would have difficulty breathing. How difficult would depend on how quickly the pneumothorax (air moving into the chest and deflating the lung) expanded. She would be transported to the ER via ambulance and receive an IV, oxygen, and vital sign monitoring.

A chest tube would be placed, likely after a quick chest film, unless she is in significant distress to re-expand the lung. If in significant respiratory distress or cardiovascular compromise then she would get a rapid needle decompression to buy some time or some facilities will go straight to chest tube placement. For a “simple” pneumothorax she would be admitted into the hospital (regular floor— not ICU) and observed.

Generally, depending on the size of the pneumothroax, it’s a few days to get the lung to re-expand, a day or two with the tube to “water seal” to make sure it stays up without suction, and then the tube would be removed. Maybe one or two more days after that to make sure all was well.

If she’s young and healthy she should recuperate pretty quickly, but would still be winded, perhaps easily fatigued for another week or two.

Hope this fits your time frame.

Author Question: Long Term Coma

Tina Asks:

I’m a self-published author who has written two books from a YA fantasy series (The Arid Kingdom) and am now working now on a modern fantasy action novel.

I’d be really grateful if you could help me with some medical advice regarding this scene:

There is an accident during a concert. A girl who was singing on the stage has her head hit by a stage lamp. She falls unconscious and remains so for eight months.

Questions:
1. Some other character with an open injury (a dagger injury) will be in the same hospital. Will they be in the same ward?
2. After she wakes up, will she have some memory problems?
3. I expect her to have some mobility issues after staying in a lying position for such a long time, like she’ll have to learn to walk again. Will her arms present similar issues?
4. How long does the recovery stage last and how is that done?

Jordyn Says:

Let’s first tackle the character who is in a coma for eight months.

What a lot of authors don’t consider is that humans eat, poop, and pee so all of these things need to be provided for in the unconscious person. If she has perpetual unconsciousness, she would need to be fed by a tube. Also, she’ll still need to poop and pee and since she can’t walk to the bathroom then she’d be placed in an adult diaper (or a catheter placed for urine drainage especially in the beginning). There are other things medically we consider in a perpetually unconscious person– most importantly– can they breathe adequately. Some can, but most end up with a trach.

When she wakes up, will she have some memory problems? You have some latitude here as a writer. Could go either way. She’ll probably be fuzzy until she figures out what happened but as far as her retaining her past experiences/memories you can decide.

This character would have whole body muscle atrophy from being bedridden for eight months. So yes, arms will be weak as well. She would be easily fatigued. Even something basic like brushing her teeth will be taxing.

Once she does wake up and is considered stable, she would be transferred to a rehab center and then transitioned to outpatient therapy. How fast and well a person does in rehab can be largely up to them. If she works hard, has a positive spirit, etc she could progress quickly if she has no other injuries. However, considering her length of unconsciousness, I’d imagine rehab would take months. Maybe eight weeks on the short side. I consulted with a physical therapist on this and he agrees. Could easily be longer. Two to four months as a range.

The character with the dagger injury would likely not be on the same ward. The unconscious person would likely initially be admitted to the ICU. The dagger injury, could even go home if not surgical. If surgical– then a regular surgical floor unless extenuating circumstances required ICU admission. Depending on the hospital, some ICU’s are split between medical and surgical.

Hope this helps and best of luck with your novel.