Author Question: Scythe Wound to the Chest (1/2)

Sue Asks:

The year is 2006 and a seventeen-year-old male gets stabbed through the right side of his chest all the way through to the back, but the blade (a hand scythe) that could potentially stop him from bleeding out gets removed. Naturally, he starts bleeding out.

I already know a lot about what goes into stabilizing him: Checking the ABCs, IVs for blood and fluid replacement, intubation (an endotracheal tube), but my question is, what is the exact treatment for this type of injury in a surgical theatre? What are the indications that he may need a thoracotomy or a lobectomy? Or is it as simple as a chest tube to treat the hemopneumothorax, connecting him to a ventilator, and then suturing the lacerations in his lung?

Jordyn Says:

Thanks so much for sending me your question, Sue. Very intriguing scenario you have here!

Let’s first clarify some of these medical terms for readers. A thoracotomy is a surgery that involves removing the lung. Lobectomy can be removal of any lobe of organs such as your thyroid, liver, or lung. In this case, you’re referring to the lung. A hemopneumothorax is a collection of blood and air inside the chest wall that is usually relieved by placement of a chest tube. Pneumothorax is an abnormal collection of air in the chest between the lung and the chest wall– also typically relieved by placement of a chest tube (though some very small ones may just be watched).

I asked a physician friend (thanks, Liz!) her thoughts on your questions.

She says the following:

Since the patient is unstable, he needs a thoracotomy by default. Other indications for surgery would be blood draining from the chest tube at greater than 100 milliliters per hour. The lungs cannot be sutured. Generally, bleeding vessels are either tied off or cauterized and the bronchi (the larger breathing tubes) are repaired. If the lobe is severely damaged then it does get removed.

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