Author Question: Nurse Comforting Orphaned Child

Erynn Asks:

First Question: What’s the protocol when a child is brought in after a traumatic event (like being the sole survivor of an accident) while waiting for next of kin if they’re not local? I had originally written a scene where a nurse was comforting him, but I feel like I remember a reader telling me they wouldn’t be allowed to hug or hold a child . . . .even if they’re alone. Is this correct? Are there nurses who wouldn’t care and would do it anyway?

Second Question: Would CPS (child protective services) necessarily be involved? The child in question has an adult sibling and a will exists that will show that he should be the guardian. Would there be any hoops for him to jump through before they let him take him home?

Jordyn Says:

I’ve worked as a pediatric ER nurse at two different large pediatric medical centers and have never been admonished to not hug or hold a child if that’s what they emotionally required. I actually find that utterly shocking any hospital would tell their nurses not to do this— though obviously understand why.

A pediatric nurse will always provide age appropriate care. Infants and toddlers usually need to be held to be comforted. With a school age child or older we would go based on the child’s cues. We would probably ask, “Do you need a hug?” or “Can I sit with you?” Sometimes, open ended questions are hard for kids who are dealing with traumatic events to answer. Questions like, “What do you need right now?” probably won’t elicit much of a response so the nurse will ask very pointed questions.

Who else could assist the child? An ED tech. A volunteer. A child life specialist.

I think you’d need to place close attention to where this novel is set and the hospital would need to match your setting. Community ER’s (common in rural areas) are more comfortable dealing with the adult patient so they might approach this situation very differently and not have as many resources available.

Child Life specialists are generally not staffed 24/7 so I would keep that in mind. I also haven’t found them outside pediatric hospitals. Same with chaplains– may not be available 24/7. Depends on the type of hospital.

As a pediatric institution, we also would probably not involve Child Protective Services though probably social work consultation would be advisable in this situation. In CO— we generally reserve CPS for concerns for abuse.

If the adult sibling could prove legal guardianship in the case of the death of the parents than the child would be released into their care. Even in the case of lack of paperwork, the child would likely go to next of kin, of which it sounds like would be this sibling.

Happy writing!

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